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Screenshot found on Australian Olympian Peter Bol’s phone contained information about doping

The national anti-doping agency, Sport Integrity Australia, has not been accused of wrongdoing by Greene. Instead, Bol’s attorney praised his conduct in dropping the case against Bol last year after retesting the original positive drug test, his A sample, and not finding it positive for the presence of EPO.

In a statement, Sport Integrity Australia declined to comment on the developments.

But it was the release of information from Sport Integrity Australia’s Bol investigation during Vuskovic’s appeal against his two-year EPO ban that sparked the claims and counterclaims involving the Australian.

During the Court of Arbitration for Sport hearing, WADA’s lawyer revealed that Sport Integrity Australia investigators had confiscated Bol’s phone and discovered a screenshot of a letter from sports drug dealer Conte to British sprinter Dwain Chambers.

Charging

The letter talked about microdosing EPO and how to avoid drug testers. The hearing was told Bol photographed him five weeks before he was drug tested and returned an initial positive drug test.

WADA scientists insisted at the hearing that Bol’s case did not involve a false positive, but rather that the test results were obscured as a result of the degradation of his urine sample in the three months between testing his initial sample A and the test of your second sample B. Then, his first sample was also retested eight months after the initial test.

The investigation into Bol was carried out by Sport Integrity Australia, but was based on tests carried out by WADA laboratories.

Greene accused WADA of continuing to smear Bol at the hearing, saying the position he had taken had no credibility or support and that he was unable to admit mistakes.

“WADA would never have agreed to review and strengthen EPO testing and procedures in light of Bol’s result if there had been sample degradation. They are still smearing Mr. Bol in this hearing and he is just a total disgrace,” Greene said.

The AMA argued that it was Greene who had raised the issue that the computer and phone seized from Bol were “clean” and was only responding to an inaccurate claim.

Bol has qualified for Paris 2024 after narrowly missing out on the medals in Tokyo.

Bol has qualified for Paris 2024 after narrowly missing out on the medals in Tokyo.Credit: fake images

“A screenshot was found on Mr Bol’s phone which was an article including a letter from Victor Conte to (former British sprinter) Dwain Chambers discussing microdosing with EPO in the off-season and various techniques were also discussed. “To game the location system, entering inaccurate information, making sure his voicemail is full,” said WADA general counsel Ross Wenzel. The location system requires athletes to report where they can be located for out-of-competition drug testing.

“This is an article about the use of EPO, how to use it out of season and the screenshot was opened on Mr. Bol’s phone on September 6, 2022, one month and five days before a sample was initially collected categorized as positive on October 11, 2022,” Wenzel said.

“When they interviewed him about this and asked him about the screenshot that was on his phone (it wasn’t in his search history, it was actually something that had been saved on his phone) the response was, ‘oh, I read a lot of things . ‘I’m interested in learning and all that’.

“I make no comment and I do not ask the panel to draw any conclusions about whether or not there was endogenous EPO in (Bol’s) sample. “I only raise that because of what was said in Mr. Greene’s closing.”

British sprinter Dwain Chambers was banned for two years after testing positive for an anabolic steroid.

British sprinter Dwain Chambers was banned for two years after testing positive for an anabolic steroid. Credit: AP

Conte was the founder and CEO of California-based BALCO (Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative), who served four months in prison after pleading guilty to conspiracy to distribute steroids.

Chambers is a former world 100m bronze medalist who served a two-year suspension for using the banned drug THG (tetrahydrogestrinone, a steroid known as The Clear), which Conte had supplied to him.

WADA scientists and lawyers said Bol’s case had been dismissed because of sample degradation, not a false positive.

“In the case of Bol, we had a very low recombinant EPO signal in sample A, which weakened in sample B, which was confirmed three months later. This question of time is important when analyzing samples with such a low concentration of recombinant EPO, as in the case of Bol, because there can be degradation over time,” WADA scientist Yvette Dehnes said at the hearing.

Another WADA scientist, Dr. Sven Voss, added: “It wasn’t just the time, it was the freeze-thaw cycle between (the tests) that could have affected the concentration.”

WADA lawyer Ross Wenzel shows a transcript of an interview with Peter Bol over a screenshot of his phone, at a Court of Arbitration for Sport hearing on the case of footballer Mario Vuskovic.

WADA lawyer Ross Wenzel shows a transcript of an interview with Peter Bol over a screenshot of his phone, at a Court of Arbitration for Sport hearing on the case of footballer Mario Vuskovic.Credit: CAS/Vimeo

Dehnes said: “When sample A was reanalysed eight months later, the signal was too low for detection, so the degradation was complete.”

Greene rejected this and said there was no evidence that there was ever synthetic EPO in Bol’s system.

“WADA will clearly never admit that they made a mistake, even when the mistake is obvious to everyone, like Peter Bol’s false positive. They are taking a position that has no credibility or support,” he said.

Greene said Vuskovic, like Bol, had provided “stress urine” after a training session and that scientists “overloaded” the sample and gave an inaccurate result.

“The same thing that caused a false positive in the Peter Bol case. I am surprised that this joint panel still does not recognize what happened in Peter’s case and that it was a false positive even though SIA (Sport Integrity Australia) did what correct and retested the sample,” Greene told the court.

“There was no evidence that EPO was present in Peter Bol’s sample and the report says so. It was a negative sample, but somehow they still say there was a low amount of EPO. “WADA will never admit when it makes a mistake and it will not admit it in the Bol case.”

Charging

Greene said former WADA chief David Howman had been scathing about his handling of the Bol case.

Howman last year described the case as a disaster for anti-doping authorities.

“The worst thing that could happen is what happened in that (Bol) case,” he said. “What we need to do is ensure that the process can be reviewed and redirected so that it does not end in such a disaster. “It’s not fair to the athlete.”

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