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Regina Humane Society rescues 26 dogs from ‘deplorable conditions’

WARNING: This story contains disturbing details.

The Regina Humane Society says its animal protection officers rescued 26 dogs living in awful conditions last week, but some of the canines’ physical or mental health was so damaged they had to be put down.

A concerned Regina resident alerted the organization last Wednesday of multiple dogs living in unsuitable conditions at a home in the city, according to the Humane Society.

Its animal protection officers found 17 adult dogs and nine puppies living in crowded housing covered in dirt, urine and feces.

Bill Thorn, the Humane Society’s director of marketing and public relations, said it’s likely that the dogs were living in the “deplorable conditions” for some time.

“It was quite clear due to the amount of excrement and dirt and urine that was an area that had been in this condition for some time. The animals in many cases, even after bathing them, still had their fur stained yellow from spending so much time lying in urine,” he said Wednesday.

“The odor of that is still there even after, you know, bathing them and trying to get them cleaned up. It doesn’t get that way overnight.”

The Regina Humane Society says its animal protection officers rescued 26 dogs covered in dirt, feces and urine on Wednesday, May 15, 2024.

The Regina Humane Society says its animal protection officers rescued 26 dogs covered in dirt, feces and urine last Wednesday. (Submitted by Regina Humane Society)

When asked whether the homeowner was facing any charges, Regina police confirmed in an email they helped the Humane Society with the May 15 investigation.

“Our records only show that we assisted,” a Regina Police Service spokesperson said, adding that the Humane Society may charge the dogs’ owner.

Thorn said he’s never seen so many dogs rescued from a single residence in his decade-long career with the Humane Society.

“(Usually) it would be cats that would have a situation like this,” he said. “It’s rare that we see this with dogs.”

While the situation is concerning, “we’re very happy that … a person did alert us to this,” he said.

A team of Regina Humane Society officers worked through the night to remove the dogs from the residence. The dogs were cleaned and groomed upon arrival at the Animal Community Center to remove fur mats, feces clinging to their coats and debris in their ears, nose and eye areas.

The dogs were then examined by a group of RHS veterinarians.

Thorn said it was determined that 10 of the rescued dogs would need to be euthanized because of extreme physical or mental injury. He added many of the dogs that were put down, and some of the dogs that remain at the Animal Community Centre, had injuries that were likely from fighting.

“It would not be possible to safely put these animals back into the community and to have them rehabilitated. It’s a difficult decision. We don’t like to see that happen,” Thorn said.

One of the rescued dogs at the RHS’s Animal Community Centre.

One of the rescued dogs at the RHS’s Animal Community Centre. (Submitted by Regina Humane Society)

Some of the dogs have been put up for adoption and one has already been adopted, Thorn said.

“We’re optimistic that the dogs that remain will be able to be adopted,” he said, but “it’s going to take a bit of time for some of them.”

Thorn said the puppies generally are in better condition than the adult dogs at the Animal Community Centre. Some of the dogs are still extremely scared and don’t know how to interact with humans, he said.

“Right now we’ve got them with staff sometimes in an office,” Thorn said. “Sometimes we’ve got one in one of our classroom areas — that just gets them to spend time with people and realize that people aren’t scary.”

He added all the rescued dogs that have been named after gemstones.

“That’s because we think they’re very precious, and people can hopefully come down and visit them and hopefully bring one of them into their home soon,” Thorn said.

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